Training/Obedience Archives

Announcement: Teaching Fido Good Table Manners

Once your dog has learned the basic steps of good canine manners – to sit, lie down, stay, and come on command – teaching her not to grab for treats, not to snatch at food, and to accept her meals in calm way will help her become a welcome part of your home during family meal time.

The first step is to make her “Sit” before you give her a treat. When she sits, hold the treat in front of her nose for a few seconds, then say “Take it,” in a firm, yet loving voice.

Allow her to “take” the treat when she reaches for it.

If your dog grabs for the treat before you make the command, or she rushes at it where you can feel her teeth, hold the treat in your hand behind your back and DO NOT give it to her.

Have her return to the sitting position, and try again, repeating “Take it” as you hold the treat in front of her. Only give her the treat when she takes it gently in her mouth at your request. Like all training, you may need to work at this several time a day for a while until she understands what you want.

Repeat these steps EVERY TIME you allow her to pick up a treat or a bite of food from your hands.

When its time for her meal, training her not to rush the bowl and grab for her food is just good “table manners.”

When you are preparing the meal, make sure she “sits” and watches. Don’t allow her to crowd around, jostle you, or jump on you. Stop preparing the food until she sits calmly on command.

As you move the bowl to its normal spot, command your dog to “Sit” and go “Down.” Do not set the bowl of food where she can get it until she is in the “down” position.

Once her bowl is in its place, tell her to “Take it,” and allow her to eat. If she rushes the bowl before you give the command, pick it up, and ask for “Sit” and “Down” again. Only give her the meal, when she completes the task on your request. Repeat these steps EVERY mealtime.

Training your dog not to snatch and grab at her own treats and food also teaches her not to try to steal yours. Being able to comfortably eat a meal or a snack without having your dog misbehave, keeps your entire family – including your pet – happy and stress-free. 

Announcement: Teaching Your Dog to Walk On a Leash

Basic Training, Part 6

Teaching Your Dog to Walk On a Leash

Dogs are not born knowing how to walk on a leash without pulling or straining. That is something you’re going to have to teach your new puppy or older, un-trained dog. For this exercise, most professional dog trainers don’t recommend using a retractable leash. Purchase a regular leash and collar or halter that gives you more control over your dog while you are training him.

Your first step is to get your dog acclimated to his collar or halter. Place them on his body and adjust each so that you can slip at least two fingers between his neck and the collar, and between his body and each strap of a halter. Make sure both are tight enough so that they don’t slip off the body or over the head, but loose enough to be comfortable.

Leave the collar or halter on him without removing it until he adjusts to it and feels calm sleeping and moving around in it. This may take a few hours to a couple of days, so patience is needed here.

Once he is relaxed, slip your leash onto his collar/halter and take him outside. Place your hand through the leash’s loop and wrap it around your wrist. This keeps your dog from possibly pulling it off your hand and getting loose.

Begin walking forward at a slow pace. If your dog refuses to follow you, hold a treat in front of his nose as you step off without allowing him to take it. Once he takes 2 or 3 steps, give him the treat and praise him. You may need to give a slight tug on the leash the first several times to get him to move, but a gentle tug is important. DO NOT pull. 

Continue with this until he is moving forward freely and looking for his treats.

This part of his training may take several days of consistent work for him to move freely on his own. Slowly take the treat away as he learns, but continue to praise him when he walks without that initial tug on the leash.

If your dog insists on walking quickly in front of you and pulling on the leash, immediately stop moving and make him sit. Give him a treat if he sits promptly. Once he learns that he won’t be allowed to take off on his own, and that he has to stay with you – and that there is a reward in that behavior – he will start walking at your pace.

Remember, consistency is the key here. You MUST train him the same way every time or you’ll have a dog that pulls and tugs when you walk him. That type of uncontrollable pet is a danger to himself and to other people and dogs on the street. 

Announcement: How Do I Keep My Dog From Begging

Many times when addressing issues with your dog, you need to learn to look at the situation as they do. Confront negative behavior with your pets as if you are confronting a toddler. We do not expect a toddler to act like an adult, and we can easily understand some behavior because it has been encouraged by the parent. The same is true with your dog. Your dog is smart and quick, your dog has learned many behaviors simply in response to things that you have done or enforced. The area of begging is one of those areas.

Your dog is begging, and you want him to stop. The first thing that you need to realize and admit is that the only reason that they are begging is because it has brought them success in the past. This dog has learned this habit and learned to use it to their benefit. If you have inherited this dog with this habit, then you’re off the hook, but everyone else… this is a habit that you helped to develop.

It is truly admirable and commendable that your dog is a big part of your life. It is understandable that you enjoy his company and distractions when you are eating. But you and your dog need to realize that this is not the time to feed your dog snacks. By allowing your dog to beg during mealtime, and by rewarding this behavior, you are encouraging a habit that you will soon realize is not something that you want them to do all of the time.

A good way to address the issue with your dog is not to loudly and brashly protest his begging, but rather, save your dogs feeding time for your mealtime. They have already learned to equate your mealtime with snack time or food time for them. Take this time, then to reschedule their mealtime with your mealtime. Save their food on the counter or a table nearby until you sit at the table. When they come to beg, you can place their food on the floor in the same place where you always place it. As you stop rewarding the begging behavior and give them their own food, they will soon learn not to beg. Decide on habits that are easy to maintain. To properly communicate to your dog that begging is not successful, you have to predetermine not to allow it to be successful – ever.

If this seems too much to ask, and you still have a problem, then determine not to eat in front of your dog. If the temptation to offer a little snack is too great, then decide to put the dog outside, or in another room while you are eating, then the begging is not allowed to happen.

The key to treating this type of behavior is consistency. Realizing how much your dog will benefit from learning to restrain himself, will make them a more well-adjusted and calmer dog.

Announcement: Outdoor Invisible Pet Fence System

California Dog Fence Proudly Offers the Pet Stop® Brand

 

Many cities and counties in this country now have laws disallowing you from chaining or tethering your dog outside in your yard. So what do you do when your pet needs to spend time outdoors and you don’t have a fence on your property?

Talk to us about purchasing our Pet Stop® Outdoor Pet Containment System, an invisible pet fence that keeps your dog or cat safe, while still allowing him to exercise in the sunlight and fresh air in his own environment.

Invisible fencing contains your pet in the designated area, keeping him from getting into any toxic plants or chemical poisons and saving him from running into the street where he can be hit by a car. Fido won’t be able to shed hair in your pool or hot tub unless you allow him to swim or play in these areas. Additionally, unlike traditional fencing, he can’t dig his way out of your yard or jump over the fence to escape.

Because all of our technology is hidden from view, you can preserve the beauty of your expensive landscaping. And for those pet parents who live in the country or have a lot of acreage, our invisible fencing is less expensive than traditional fencing that can cost as much as $25 per linear foot.

So, not only do we protect your furry companion from harm, we save you money!

For a free in-home estimate of our Pet Stop® Outdoor Pet Containment System, call us at 714-878-2696, or send us your questions and contact information on our Contact Us  page and we will answer your questions in a timely manner.

The Pet Stop® Difference

Announcement: Benefits of a Room Wizard® Indoor Pet Containment System

 

Room Wizard® Indoor Pet Containment System

Pet Stop’s Room Wizard® Indoor Pet Containment System was developed to keep your pets safe and problem-free while they’re in your home. Knowing that your much-loved furry companion can’t eat something he shouldn’t, or climb on something that can topple over on her, saves you hours of worry when you can’t be home to supervise.

With our Gentlesteps™ Training method, we can confine your pets, both canine and feline, to certain areas of your house when you’re not at home.

We’ll keep the cats off your counter tops and tables, and ensure that the dogs don’t get into the trash, grab food off the table, or sit in your favorite chair. We’ll stop your dogs from rummaging in the cat litter box, and make sure kitty stays out of the baby’s nursery.

When its time to potty train your dog, we can make sure he stays in one room of your house until he is conditioned to go outside to do his “business.” And if you have a cat with inappropriate elimination issues, keeping her in the same room with her litter box is a breeze with our indoor containment system.

Our technicians are trained to install either a wired or wireless containment system in your home. If you need the wired system, we can hide the wires under your carpet and/or along your baseboards so that the necessary technology doesn’t mar the beauty of your home.

For a free in-home estimate of our Room Wizard® Indoor Containment System, call us at 714-878-2696, or send us your questions on our Contact Us  page.    

 

Announcement: Teaching Your Dog to Come

Basic Training, Part 4

Teaching Your Dog to Come

The final part of the basic training of any dog is teaching her to come when called. Whether she’s playing with her doggy friends at the dog park or you’re asking her to come get a treat in a quiet, dignified manner, getting her to immediately respond and approach you when you command is necessary for her safety and your peace of mind.

Once your dog is sitting, lying down, and staying in place when you ask, go back to attaching a long lead onto her collar or halter. Ask her to “Stay” as you would normally, then back away a few feet and stop, still holding onto the lead.

Call her name, saying “Come” in a kind, but firm tone, and give her a treat when she responds. If she doesn’t respond immediately, pull on the lead gently to make her come to you, then treat her.

At this point, ask your dog to sit, lie down, and stay, and you back even further away. Stop, call her saying “Come,” then treat her when she responds. Every time she doesn’t come when called, pull gently on the lead until she answers.

Continue training this way, expanding the distance between your dog and yourself with every session. You may have to reinforce your teaching by starting each new session closer than you ended the previous one, but that is to be expected. As in all other training, don’t spend more than 20 minutes at a time teaching your dog a new trick.

As you become more and more confident that your pet is going to listen and respond to every part of the “sit, down, stay, and come” routine, you can begin to remove the lead and train without using it. Don’t attempt to take off the lead unless you are in your home, a fenced yard, or you have installed an in-ground dog fencing system and you know your pet cannot get away from you. 

 

Announcement: Teaching Your Dog to Stay

Basic Training, Part 3 – Teaching Your Dog to Stay

 

Now that your dog has learned how to sit and lie down when asked, teaching her to stay in one place without moving can provide you a measure of security that she won’t run off when she’s out in your yard, and she won’t be grabbing for her food dish when it’s time for dinner.

Attach a long lead, one that is approximately 15- to 20-feet in length, to your dog’s collar or halter.

Command her to sit, then lie down in front of you, and make sure all of her attention is focused on you.

Once she is lying down, put the flat of your hand in front of her face in a “stop” gesture, and say the word “Stay,” in a kind, yet firm tone.

Back slowly away from your pet, keeping your hand in the “stop” gesture until you are standing approximately 2 to 3 feet away from her. If she stays without moving, go quickly back and give her a treat. 

If she moves to come toward you, go back to your original position, ask her to “Sit” and go “Down,” and start over. Do not give her a treat if she moves.

Once your dog is staying at that distance consistently, begin to gradually move further away every time you command her to “Stay.” Remember to keep using the flat of your hand and the tone of your voice to ask her to pay attention to what you are wanting.

Train at each distance until she “stays” every time, then move away during the next training session. You may need to occasionally go back and repeat a training session at a previous distance as a refresher. 

As in the other training sessions, only spend 20-minutes increments teaching her this new command. Use her dinnertime to reinforce this training by not placing her food dish in front of her until she has successfully stayed in one place for 5 seconds. 

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